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IV. STORY
 

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3. Climax & After

 
(i) THE DOWNHILL GLIDE
 

The climax should be the easiest part of the novel to write. If you’ve set everything up well, it almost writes itself.

I think of it as the toboggan ride, the downhill glide. This is my favourite part of the writing process, even more enjoyable than the early planning stages, which I also love.

The other side of the coin is that, if your climax keeps blocking and snagging, then it’s probably not just the climax you need to revise, but everything that leads up to it. Problems at the climax usually stem from unnoticed problems in the middle. At least, that’s my experience.

I’m not saying you should plan towards a climax from early on. I used to try that for my first few novels, and it had the opposite effect. I was always having to go back and revise. Now I rely on gut feeling. I know when I’ve got the material for a good, powerful climax, even though I can’t tell exactly how it’ll pan out.

I guess stories in novels work the other way round to reports in newspapers. The first two sentences of a newspaper report give the central facts, the next two paragraphs give the less important facts, and the remaining paragraphs fill out the smaller details. From most important to least important …

That’s the natural sequence for telling things in real life too. First. ‘There was a car crash on Hudson Street! I think someone was killed!’ Then ‘It was a truck and a car. There was glass and blood everywhere. I saw the ambulance come. The car was mashed in like you wouldn’t believe.’ And finally, perhaps, a run-through of all the events in order.

By contrast, good storytelling in a novel withholds. The author doesn’t blurt out all the best bits as soon as possible, but keeps the reader waiting, in suspense. And isn’t this the mark of a good oral storyteller too?

I believe in holding some material in reserve for a powerful climax. You don’t want to approach the end of a novel in a state of exhaustion. You don’t want to discover you’ve already used up all your most evocative settings, your most effective twists of character, your most exciting action, etc etc.

Keep some good stuff back for the climax!

OTHER CLIMAX & AFTER TOPICS

(ii) FINDING CONVERGENCES

(iii) RUNNING OUT OF PUFF

(iv) WINDING DOWN

(v) CLOSURE VS SEQUELS

(vi) THE FINAL NOTE

(vii) BEGINNING AGAIN

Other Story Topics

1.Beginnings

2. Middles

4. Narrative Momentum

5. Pacing

 

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Richard Harland.